Copyright Reform

Debunked: There Is No "SOPA 2014"

by Communications Associate Kevin Erickson

Hailed as a new step towards a more open, responsive government, The White House’s petition site is in the news again as a key reason for the passage of a bill legalizing cell phone unlocking, signed into law this month. However, as a recent Time Magazine article points out, a handful of popular petitions are still awaiting a White House response despite having surpassed the 100,000 signatures mark, which was supposed to trigger an official reply. Among the petitions crossing this threshold were two that caught our attention: “Stop SOPA 2013” and “Stop SOPA 2014.”

Oddly, the Time article doesn’t mention that the White House already responded thoughtfuly and extensively to a petition about SOPA back in 2012. But much more disconcerting than the lack of official response to the new petitions is the fact that so many people have signed petitions expressing fierce opposition to legislation that they don’t seem to know doesn’t actually exist.

Submitted by kevin on August 28, 2014 - 4:41pm

Copyright Hearing Recap: Remedies

by Kevin Erickson, Communications Associate.

On July 24, the House Judiciary Subcommitee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and The Internet continued its ongoing review of copyright law with a hearing on the topic of Remedies. US Copyright laws give creators a number of exclusive rights controlling how their works can be used, but when one of those rights are violated, they must have options for recourse. As Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) noted, the legal maxim goes “there’s no right without a remedy.” That’s what this hearing addressed, and while there was consensus that the current system leaves plenty of room for improvement, a wide range of views were presented on what problems currently exist, and how to solve them. (You can watch the full hearing and read written testimony at the House Judiciary website.)

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Submitted by kevin on August 10, 2014 - 10:20am

FMC To Congress: Preserve Artists' Ability To Recapture Rights

July 14, 2014

WASHINGTON, DC—On Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at 1PM, the House Judiciary subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet will hold the latest in a series of hearings on current copyright law. Future of Music Coalition Vice President for Policy and Education, Casey Rae, will testify at a hearing on “Moral Rights, Termination Rights, Resale Royalty and Copyright Term.”

Rae, a musician, artist advocate and educator, will underscore the importance of creators’ ability to file to reclaim copyrights they had previously transferred to a label or publisher following a 35-year period established by Congress in the 1976 Copyright Act. read more

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